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Old 12-08-2011, 01:50 PM   #1
Neb
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Dawson Motorsport's Budget Enduro RR Car Build

Afternoon all,

First of all let me introduce Dawson Motorsport because your all thinking i've never heard of them....

We are a couple of chaps in a shed in Kent, who between us have built a fair few rally cars for different purposes.
Mostly Mk1 & Mk2 Escorts (1970's 80's 90's 00's), a few imprezas (late 90's Barretts Motorsport & MSE), Nova's (90's), Sunbeams (90's) but more recently, since 2006, i've had my MSA licence, A 106 Rallye Enduro Road/Stage Rally car, a Rover 200 Enduro Road/Stage Rally car, and most recent a Mk2 Escort (as my avatar).

We are not a company, just a father & son who enjoy pointing cars between the trees. The old man is my nav.

There is loads more bullsh!t about us on the website, in my signiture at the bottom.

The Car:

It's a K plate 106 XSI, currently running a 1600cc lump, which will be replaced with a re-built 1360cc. I got stupidly bored with a family Vectra estate, so was after a plaything, and picked up this Grey XSI in need of some loving, from a young lady in Bexley for the sum of £425 from the 106oc.

Here she is with a new set of rims on her, after i had sprayed the roof & rear 1/4 (other side) and given her a good polish. The stickers are gone now.... but i'm still waiting for my Rallye Register ones..... hint hint....

[/IMG]


It's got the usual car park dings etc, few spots of rot around (inner wings, rear inner 1/4 etc) but generally is good fun to fling around the lanes round here.

I've built an exhaust from bits left over in the garage, using the original 4" can that was on it (bit rude boy), that'll get replaced with a skidded standard system probably.

I recently replaced the knackered front suspension with B6's and Elbach Pro's replaced a bottom arm and drop links, tank taped up the cv boots (again shafts to be replaced) and knocked up my own strut brace. Replaced the knackered rear shocks with some second hand Billy forest shockers (which are actually good on the road too). Fitted some 1144's but still having problems with the rear locking up - makes spirited driving interesting though.

Basically the car has been given a fair amount of love in the last few months (probably a bit to much if my missus is asked) more than i can type on here.

The Escort is being used for the World Cup London to Cape Town Rally in January, so i've decided to build myself a little budget rally car to go and have some fun in when the Escort comes back and more than likely will have to be rebuilt.

I'm probably going to use it to do the Endurance Road Rally Championship next season, where i was the 2008 1300cc champion (and the Escort is inelagiable) as well as Chelmsford MC's brilliant Gym-Kar-Na's, and a series of Autotests, Autosolos, PCT's, Scatter & 12 car rallies which are a bit closer to home.
Track days etc don't really interest me on all honesty although i've not done one and Brands is only up the road....

I might put a MSA stage log book on it if the funds are there to do it.

So the plan of a attack - from back to front:
Deck out the boot to take two spares (going to run 13" to use the Escort tyres too!!! Also lowers the gearing) and tools/nut gun/parts etc.
Rebuild/replace the rear beam with drums & standard ride height.
Sort out the rot.
Make and fit a tank guard.
Move all lines inside - will probably use copper for the brakes.
Fit a cage, extingushers, trip, map & internal lights (caravan jobbies).
Fit 4 point harnesses - but probably keep the standard seats, although a mate has a pair of date ones i might have when he replaces his.
Remove all sound deadning.
Plate the sunroof in ally.
Replace the engine with a 1360 along with a rebuilt 'box.
Whilst the engine is out plate the tops of the strut towers & seam weld areas around the bulkhead, suspension pick up points etc.
Raise the spring pans to give some extra ride height. I might go for a coilover conversion from rally design - 190lbs 9" was what we ran on the Rallye.
Replace the Rad for a new one and fit a second switchable fan.
Replace the shafts.
Fit some spots.
And all the other little bits and pieces that you don't notice till you get there.....

Sorry for the essay so far, will update as soon as the build starts, currently collecting bits. If you have parts of interest let me know. I'm after an XSI lump, rear beam etc.

Great site BTW, lots of knowledgeable people, and a lack of bullsh!t, honest answers etc. I'm also happy to help out any locals if needed.

If you have got any idea's that'll help me out please add to the thread.

All the best,

Ben
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Old 04-01-2013, 04:21 PM   #2
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Following on from the XSI above which never came off the ground (it wasn't the nicest of shells) I bought a N reg Peugeot 106 Rallye in a shade of cherry red in August.

The progress jobbie here is a bit of an afterthought, so bear with me, as of Monday the Mot is looming.

I found the car on here, for £250 which had been stripped to be used as a track day car.
The shell is clean and straight in the right places, but has been resprayed by a blind man at some point in the past. I haven't factored in another respray so it will be built as it is and I'll get the kids out with the T-cut.....



The plan is to complete the build for less than £1000 using whatever kit we have left over from various builds, and 2nd hand parts from eBay, lax bowels style forums and here. I'm not going to include in the build pricing any fuel used to collect parts, postage or consumables.

I'm hoping the car will be competitive and at the same time showing it doesn't have to break the bank.

It came with a 1600 xsi/S2 Rallye engine (subject of debate currently) and had a XSI box with a shot diff in it so the box came out and was rebuilt by Mepster recently.
It had the S1 Rallye ecu (now to used as a spare), inlet manifold (dunno yet), exhaust manifold (spare) & wiring loom (re-used).

Because it was a late S1 shell it had a few anomalies like S2 struts and S2 hydraulic O/S engine mount, these have been re-used rather than revert back to early stuff following advice from the uber helpful chaps on here.

More to come - got to do some work before the weekend!
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:27 PM   #3
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Well, first rally this weekend, last few bits and bobs to finish off, first time I've actually sat down for an evening!

Here is the build details for those interested, and a spec.

1996 Peugeot 106 Rallye (Series 1)
Chassis:
Lightened body shell
Seam welded & strengthened engine bay
All sound deadening removed
Sunroof plated in aluminum
Safety Devices 6 point bolt in roll cage & door bars
Seat belt bar
6mm Marine Grade Aluminum Sump Guard
4mm Aluminum Tank Guards
Lower front panel removed & radiator & sump guard bar added
FIA mudflaps

Engine:
1294cc TU2J2 All Alloy Block & Head
Aluminum Inlet & aftermarket induction kit
Approx 100bhp @ 7200rpm & 80lbs/ft @ 5400rpm (flywheel figures)
Single box exhaust & CAT
Additional switched cooling fan
Polybushed lower engine mount & group N gear box mount, S2 Hydraulic engine mount
Re-located Fuel Filter & Braided Steel lines

Transmission:
Ian Mepham built S1 Rallye gearbox
Valeo clutch
Griffiths Engineering quick shift
Interparts uprated 106 GTI drive shafts

Suspension & brakes:
Front:
Bilstein B4 shock absorbers with 2 ľ” Coil-over conversion (9”x225lbs springs) & Group N top mounts
Bendix Aluminum Brake Calipers with Rally Design Maxtorque brake pads & vented discs
Strengthened Lower Arms (Peugeot Sport spec +)
Rear:
Torsion bar rear beam with Bilstien “black capped” forest dampers
Rear drums
Steel Brake Lines in car, flexible Goodridge hoses to Calipers/Drums.

Accessories & other:
Cibie Oscar Spot Lamps
Re-located windscreen washer bottle
Rigard Rally Seats
6 point Willans seat belts
Momo Steering wheel
FIA Master switch
1.75kg FEV fire extinguisher
Additional Fuse box for Navigational equipment
Trip meter, Map light, Cage light, & boot & cabin lights & potti
Aluminum Navigators foot rest
Spear wheel holder, tool box

Build diary, you may notice it's sort of written slightly weirdly.... Like for a publication....
There is a lot of words, not many pictures yet but will up load some more soon.



1. Choice & collection of the car and build plan:
Pick a good shell, at reasonable value and within reasonable distance. We had run a 106 rallye when I started rallying in 2006 and it was a great fun car.
The one I picked was £250 and it came from Tonbridge Wells about 40 miles away. It had a sunroof (not ideal) but was a genuine Series 1 Rallye shell so was worth a lot more than it was being sold for.
It had been re-sprayed by a blind man and the owner was giving up on it following spending quite a bit on bits and pieces to try and get it running in his small single garage. His plan was to build a track day car.
It came with a few spares 2x doors, a front bumper (quite rare) and various other bits and bobs. The engine in it was wrong (1600cc) but the ECU & engine wiring loom, aluminum rallye inlet (rare) & gearbox were all ok to use and parts of the existing engine, sensors coolant hoses, exhaust, Polybushed Lower arms etc were all in good nick and the same parts across the range so could be used as spares.

We got it back to Chez Dawson Snr on a trailer and started to look at the car in the semi warm garage before we went too far, & we had to look at what it needed for an MOT before getting to deep into the project and wasting time & money.
We discovered the Indicators were not working (re-wired in the end) a lot of the interior controls (fan/heater/dash clocks/interior lamps) were fubar’ed (again some re-wiring work) and I discovered some rust under the O/S front wing (which was cut out and plated). Small things but all mount up. Other than those things the shell was good but need some TLC.
Around the same time I started firing some questions over to Rob (ERRC Scrut) to check eligibility of certain modifications I wanted to make.
I was looking at using cheap off cuts of carpet from a local carpet supplier rather than buying a full 106 carpet (ended up using the XSI carpet), Bottom suspension arm strengthening (a known weak point on 106’s), rear seat belt bar and a few other things.

We started to plan the build properly:
A. against the £1000 budget (could it be done?) I sat for a couple of evenings working out costs for cages and the little bits and it seemed possible if very difficult, but would have to call in some favors!
B. A light weight but strong shell. Our experience of the LtoCT in the Escort played part to this.
Within endurance regs you can remove certain trim parts behind the rear seats which includes any metal brackets. I weighed the results after many hours and we removed just short of 30kg. A lot of the wiring not required was also removed.
I had made calls to friends within rallying to see what spares they had, other companies that with 106 rallye register club discounts would help me out & of course the legend that is Ian Mepham (long time Pug genius) for some build advice (& eventually parts & gearbox build) about areas requiring strengthening (front top mounts, lower arm mounts, seam welding the engine bay etc).
We are lucky enough to have built many rally cars over the years (and fettled others) so with a box I started digging around the garage for parts that could be re-used (& gathering dust) or could be repaired for the 106.
Map light, Interior Light, Ally for Sunroof panel, Mud Flap Material + Brackets (made the brackets), Pencil holder, Aux Fuse panel, Cable, Relays, Bonnet pins, Washer bottle (re using original Pug pump) Ally Tape (nicked from building site....) Scissor Jack, Battery, Spot Lights, brackets, wiring etc, Exhaust back box, Spare wheel holder – bay window ally tube (bro in law was a window fitter) & Tool Box (in pink) – (bought when I worked for a rally team by them as a bit of joke).

Many parts that required fabrication we would make ourselves (sump guard fitting kit, top mount plates, FIA master switch plate, navigators foot plate etc).

I had decided that I wanted to run a front suspension coil-over conversion to 2 1/4” springs (wide selection of spring poundages & lengths) using Rally Design kits. My budget would not stretch to running Peugeot Sport kit so was a budget decision.
I wanted to run steel braided petrol hoses (new) and the brake lines through the car for safety (brake lines were the existing ones just re-bent to suit). I needed new braided lines to the calipers/drums but we already had these.
Another part of the build was to plan the locations of equipment to try and split the weight of the car evenly along with getting weight down in the shell as low as possible to gain a better centre of gravity. Locations of us, spare wheels, tool box, washer bottle and various spares would have to be planned.

Last edited by Neb; 11-02-2013 at 08:51 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:35 PM   #4
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2. Bringing the car up to MOT & start of build:
Once we had worked out the shell was straight and there was no major rot to worry about we started looking at bring the car up to a standard we could start from.
First we looked at sorting out an area of rust int the inner wing on the offside front, an area on a 106 that is well known to have issues over time. We started by cutting out the section of the inner wing that was 'orrible, and cut first of all some cardboard to make a template and then some old metal shelving in to a plate to weld into place. It ended up being a relatively large plate once the wing was taken back to good metal. Once it was welded in it was covered in seam sealer to keep moisture out and painted over in some red paint.
Whilst the car was in the air I added some Wurth rust converter (good stuff) on any areas was surface rust (once a wire brush had been over it) and sprayed over it. An evenings work.


Other things that were issues for road use were the front & side indicators which had been replaced by some dodgy side LED jobbies by a previous owner. The wiring was shorting on the car so I replaced the whole lot with new twin sheathed cable as far back in the loom as I could. Once the fuse had been replaced all was well. Couple of hours in total.

Next up was the sunroof. Not a job I was looking forward to having had issues with 106 sunroofs previously. Most leak, were never fitted properly in the factory by Pierre, usually all the fixing bolts rot and cannot be run on a rally car anyway. A quick email to Rob to ask what the thickness of the ally needed to be and I found some old thin 1mm thick checker plate ally used previously on another rally car. It took a couple of hours to get the roof and it's gubbins out (most fixings were rotten) whilst trying to be carful not to break any of the outer trims which I wanted to re-use to house the ally panel as it has a seal which looked ok. Bit more aerodynamic too.
I sprayed the ally panel in Satin black, drilled a series of holes offset from the edge and other than a bit of cutting and trimming it went in easy enough with some self tapping screws. I didn't seal it with any sealer at this point incase I needed it out when installing the cage but 95% of the work on the roof was done.

There were a few other little jobs needing doing like the horn being replaced, a small patch of rust in the boot, the lower arm bushes were shot (more of that later), exhaust was blowing (again a later project), rear shock absorbers were leaking etc etc, most jobs would be looked at later in the build as they were being replaced or uprated.

In all it is a decent lightweight 106 rallye shell, with little grot, and hopefully a bright future. The 106 rallye's from the factory had lightweight glass and all the electric gear removed, a proper homologation special.

3. The XSI.....

I had been asked to help out a mate who was Clerk of the course on the Woodbridge stages with being steward and during the rally another mate from Chelmsford MC had said he had a early 106 XSI endurance rally car in his pig sty built by someone else with no mot or tax, but had all the right bIts on it, other than suspension which he wanted to get shot of.
It was going to put me well over budget but when I worked out what parts were on it I could keep (cage, tank & sump guards, seats, belts, wheels and other bits and pieces) and parts I could sell on online 106 forums it worked out a viable proposition. So I went for it.
It arrived around October time, i had thought about building that, but the rallye is slightly rarer and puts me in the class I want to be in the ERRC, 1000cc to 1300cc rather than the 1300cc to 1400cc (XSI was 1360cc) which is class the Rovers have got tied up generally. Soon enough the XSI was stripped of parts, good bits kept for spares (most are interchangeable) and the shell was in pieces chopped up. Parts sold quickly (see table) some haven't sold but remain as spares and I have made a bit of profit on it, although only getting £30 for the shell at the scrappers!

4. Strip down of Rallye chassis (internally) for welding of seat rails and plates for the feet of the cage, removal of unwanted weight.

Now that we had the safety devices cage from the xsi, we could start on the interior of the car. We trial fitted the cage which lead us to a problem with the sunroof in a structure being too low at certain points, this was swiftly sorted out with a big hammer! We then cut the 3mm thick plate for the six points of the cage from cardboard templates and then beat them by hand in readiness to be MIG welded to the car. We had to remove the fuel tank, lines, brake lines, dashboard, seats and release the internal wiring loom to allow us to weld the plates in. Whilst everything was out, the remaining sound deadening was removed.


We also wanted to install proper seat mounting bars to take a pair of seats we had gained for a friend who was upgrading because they were out of date (for the ERRC, out of date seats and belts can be used so long as they are in good condition).

Before fitting the seat bars, we contacted Rob to clarify the size of the mounting plate required by the MSA so we could future proof in case we wanted to get a stage rally car log book. These took a bit of time to make up as we wanted the navigator as far down and back in the car as possible and for the driving position to be comfortable. Whilst the interior of the car was all out, we welded the seatbelt mounting plates for the eyelets and also mocked up the shoulder strap bar that would also work as a rear strut brace.


5. Collection of parts to carry out build that were not available from the XSI.

There were areas of the build which the purchase of the XSi did not cover. Online Peugeot 106 forums and EBay took care of lots of bits and pieces including an induction kit, group N engine mounts, a Peugeot Sport exhaust, new bottom arms, track rod ends, ARB drop links, grp N top mounts, drive shafts, 3 extra wheels, and those little bits and pieces that we needed to complete.
It ws also a good time to get ride of the bits I didnít need from the XSI, engine, shafts, struts, wiring loom & ECU all went as a package to a chap in Scotland by pallet, many other bits and bobs sold via the forums. Because the XSIís are becoming rare parts are wanted and Iím luck to have broken more than even on it. We decided the bucket seats & 4 point belts that came in the XSI were not needed either having been given the other seats & coming across a pair of 6 point belts from a Porsche 911 race car that were out of date for less than half their original cost.

We also used Rally Design for the 2 1/4Ē coil over conversion, 180lbs springs (later to be 225lbs), brake pads and small sundry items like FIA master switch and Trip meter speedometer transducer as the rallye runs a later electronic set-up rather than a cable.
We found online a supplier of stainless steel braided fuel hose and ends which was about half the price of a Motorsport supplier. We needed the fuel hose to run through the car as I had relocated the fuel filter into the engine bay.

6. Removal of engine, seam welding of engine bay, insertion of engine & gearbox

Another part which we needed quite desperately was the correct engine.

The Rallye came from the previous owner with a 1600 iron block saxo VTR engine which we couldn't run so we found a chap in Wales who was breaking another Rallye and bought the correct ally blocked 1300 screamer.

The old engine came out within a few hours and we removed parts we could reuse as spares like sensors, hoses, inlet & exhaust mainifold/downpipe, clutch & cables (interchangeable with the new engine) and the engine bay was washed down in readiness for seam welding and strengthening.

Available online were the original French Peugeot Sport factory build manuals which gave a guide of where to seam weld and strengthen various parts of the chassis, the engine bay being one of the key areas which required a great deal of preparation. Over a period of a week, the paint was stripped back, panels prepared and seam welded, lower suspension arm pick up points boxed in, bulk head welded, engine mounting brackets strengthened and welded and 4mm strut top plates cut, dressed and installed. We also took the opportunity to make up the radiator and sump guard mounting bar which required the original lower front panel cross member being cut out and new brackets fabricated using the PS build manual as a guide.




At the end of the week, the engine arrived but before it went in, we needed to have the Rallye gearbox rebuilt by a friend, Ian Mepham which was a long evenings work. In preparation of the engine installation, the engine wiring loom was checked and all hoses were inspected as they would be a pain to get at once the running gear was in. Other than a slight issue with the Rallye being built with a later style hydraulic upper engine mount installation was relatively straight forward and was only a Saturday's work. The engine fired up that evening. Winner, winner, chicken dinner!!

Last edited by Neb; 12-02-2013 at 12:41 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:39 PM   #5
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7. Insertion of the cage, seats & belts, putting the dash back in, FIA master switch & rally equipment in general (tool boxes etc).

Now came the fun bit, getting the car back together.
The fitting of the cage was a nightís work, the dash carcass had to go back in first which meant cable tying all the wiring as tight as possible to the interior bulkhead behind it and routing the large bore master switch cables through the firewall for installation at a later date. All the internal trims had to go back in and cut to suit the cage along with the re-sited washer bottle, as I had wanted to move it inside the car and out of the wheel arch where it would get beaten up by gravel rash.
Now the cage feet had been welded in the cage was that little bit higher so out came the Ďmer again to ďadjustĒ the sunroof. All the feet bolt holes were drilled in situ & new bolts & nylocks were used to fix it in, but the door bars were left out as they would get in the way for the rest of the build. Fitting the cage in situ took an evening.

Seats and belts were relatively straight forward, just a bolt in/clip in job, but the rear seat belt bar needed to be installed, which meant locating the spare wheels to ensure clearance + a little bit. A couple of hours to get them in and comfortable for both of us.

Whilst preparing the shell a lot of thought had gone into placing the tools, spares & spare wheels in locations which would benefit both weight distribution & easy access. All the equipment was to be installed into the boot. I had an old aircraft style case in pink I had been given as a joke when I had worked for a rally team in the North which fitted perfectly and could carry the tools & majority of the spares. The spare wheel post was made from a piece of bay window Ally tube with a steel fixing in the end (to bolt to the chassis) which I had got from my brother in law (there is a house in Margate with slightly floppy bay windowsÖ). The scissor jack has an ally checker plate bolted to the bottom to help with jacking on soft ground and has a hole to locate it over the post. Both the wheels and the jack are held down with a sufficient ratchet strap with seat belt eye bolts to the body shell. Also over the boot working area is a fluorescent lamp fixed to the roof which is switched on when the boot is open using a push switch. Because of the removal of the boot trims it was a bit of a pain to get working right, but an hour saw it all fitted and working.


Next up was re-connecting all the dash board wiring, which included all the rally equipment we require to compete. We have installed a trip, cage light, Map light, additional Interior lamp, potti (lit magnifying glass) & FIA master switch and an additional switches for the Spot lights and auxiliary fan. Of course being put together at the factory originally by Francois most of the dash bulbs didnít work any more so they had to be replaced by ones I had kept from the XSI. Fiddly job. A couple of other issues with the dash were the lack of speedo (later tracked down to a broken wire in the engine bay) and lack of Oil temperature gauge (sensor).
The rally equipment was installed using an auxiliary fuse box, which make life a lot easier to find a problem if a fuse blows as itís located on a small panel that covers where the stereo would have been situated. Theory being that if a fuse goes youíll probably notice the flash of light as it goes and can be replaced quickly. We used some thick polycarbonate to make up the panel and the fuse box was screwed on, it has been powered directly off the back of the master switch to ensure that no problems can occur with using existing wiring. The switch for the spots was situated next to the fuse box so itís in easy reach.
The trip had itís own panel made from thin ally sheet to site it in front of the navigator. The glove box was removed and cut to go around the cage & make getting to the existing car fuse box easier, and the potti has been held in the glove box with a elastic strap. All the lighting equipment was fixed to the roof or cage as applicable with cable run up inside the windscreen pillar trims.
An additional panel was added from the short centre consul to the area where the ashtray used to be to take the FIA Master switch and potti power jack. We drafted in our tame auto electrical guru Rodders to wire up the master switch & spots, mainly because the large bore battery cables require a terminal of some girth crimped on the end (donít want these coming off!!) We wanted him to take a good look over what we had done as well to make sure we had dotted the tís.


Next up was get the suspension converted to coil-overs, strengthen the bottom arms and take it up the road for the MOT.

Last edited by Neb; 12-02-2013 at 12:49 PM.
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Old 11-02-2013, 08:48 PM   #6
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8. MOT, Suspension, Sump guard, tank guards, exhaust, spotlights, mud flaps – general little bits and pieces to get the car ready for its first rally.

The big one was coming, the first drive and the MOT. Whilst I’m happy that our skills extend to building a half decent rally car there is always that worry of the MOT man not getting laid the night before. I had booked the MOT for a week after the Christmas break, which gave me a bit of time to get the front suspension built, and a bit of leeway to sort the little issues like setting up the brakes.

The coil-overs – I’m quite proud of these. I did a lot of research on the net for pictures of how various people had done them, asked lots of questions about mounting methods and finally came up with a plan.
See pictures
A standard Pug Strut with the standard kit and damper removed

Threaded sleeve cut and welded in situ

Built strut using the machined Rally Design top spring cap, and standard Peugeot equipment, bearing, top & bottom sombrero’s and standard top mount all fitted to the car.


I’ve decided following driving the car that the springs were a bit soft at 180lbs so I have changed them since doing them originally for 225lbs. I’ve been able to retain a good ride height as well which was a bonus. It sits a little higher than standard which should suit the rough stuff. Hopefully when we get out in the forests this will be the right move but with little time to test we’ll have to suck it and see.
The front dampers are Bilstien B4’s (15% uprated from standard) and at the back we are running “black cap” Peugeot Sport Gravel Bilstiens which I got cheap from that man Mepham. The rear beam/torsion bars & anti roll bars are standard Rallye and standard height.
Also we strengthened the standard bottom arms to resemble the Peugeot Sport supplied items (which are about 4 times the price). We used some 4mm steel plate cut and welded to reinforce areas that bend on the arms. A cheap solution to a problem faced on most 106’s abused on gravel. To carry out the modifications to the suspension took a couple of evenings of practical work but a few evenings of planning too, plus a bit of machining time for the spring caps.
All the suspension was bolted back on the car and the MOT was looming.

The Car failed first time out on the MOT due to an emissions issue. I had put it down to the car not being run in a while and needed a good clear out but unfortunately this was not the case. The Lambda sensor had gone and this only got sorted following changing the exhaust for the one of my other rallye (thought it could have been the CAT) and an evening of changing sensors, including a wasted trip back to the MOT station where it still failed. Once the Lambda was done it went through, so we had a ticket! Third time lucky!

I could now start to use the car, the Sportway Tyres for the championship had arrived so I could drive the car using the correct tyres and she felt good. Light, relatively quick, stopped well and seemed to handle the bumps ok although a bit soft at that point. Of course there was a list of little bits and pieces along with a list of big bits and pieces 3 of those being the Exhaust, Tank Guard & Sump Guard. All 3 needed to be done together as they all have an impact on each other. If the exhaust doesn’t run in the right place it affects the guards and vibrates, if the guards are too high then the exhaust has to be modified to fit. So we started with the exhaust.

I had some old 106 exhausts knocking around the garage, so got them all on floor and started to look at the best of them. We have to run a CAT so this was kept and a 1100cc 106 system was selected out of the group as it has no centre exhausts boxes that can be knocked off. I had gained a Powerflow slim rear box which I was going to use at the noisy end so with some axle stands in place I started mocking the system up using old bends. I wanted to get it as high up in the tunnel as possible so everything had to be cut and shut to suit. A couple of evenings later the exhaust was all welded up and fitted.

The next evening the 4mm ally tank guards were fitted (these came from the XSI) these were again bent, cut & shut to suit and fitted. The next evening I got in touch with a mate who runs a sheet metal fabrication business and we rendezvoused to cut & bend some 6mm marine spec checker plate ally to make the sump guard, using a pre made template. I knew the location of the front fixing bar (already fitted as it mounts the radiator too) but I hadn’t yet cut the rear feet which would be made from very thick bore steel gas pipe and would locate on the bottom arm mounting brackets. An evening at the fabricators followed by an evening of physically fitting it and it was done. Counter sunk allen headed bolts were used to fix the rear of the guard to the feet to make the bottom of the guard.



Slowly we were ticking off the jobs:
The Spotlight brackets were made up from 4mm steel (ally can get stress cracks and break when It vibrates) and these were bolted to the bonnet along with the “engineered” adjusters which had been bent previously in a accident (not me!)
Mud flaps were made up from 6mm thick rubber we had gained from my godfather who runs a rubber wholesaler and the brackets were made from ally checker plate cut with a hole saw and bent to suit and then fixed to the car using self tapping bolts.
Other jobs we had to do were re-bleed the brakes, fit all the little bits and pieces in the car, the first aid kit, warning triangle, small spill kit & ground sheet were put under elastic webbing that also holds the rear seats down. Tank tape, rad weld, superglue, exhaust paste & exhaust repair wrap all go in the driver’s door pocket. The 2ft 1/2” extension bar fits in under the door bar on the driver’s side using terry clips and a neat little thin sheet ally bracket (all my own work…..) so we can quickly get to it if we get a puncture. In the boot the scissor jack handle was fitted, again using terry clips. Inside the bootlid, large cable ties. Glove box holds the trip speedo sensor transducer in a cotton bud plastic box so it can’t get wet and the potti. Navigators door pocket holds the fuse identification drawing, circuit diagrams and clipboard all required on a rally.
Other bits outside of the cabin were protection for the fuel filler pipe, plastic arch guards along with covering any holes to keep water out, covering the coolant pipe that runs to the back of the engine in rubber, tidy up the engine bay wiring and cable tie the spare alternator belt under the scuttle. The XSI strut brace was re-used, although bent to suit the Ally inlet manifold & brake master cylinder.
A good service was also carried out, along with the timing belt, tensioner & water pump. I’ve used some good quality engine & gearbox oils (competition spec) as the car is going to get the nuts revved off it.

Many little jobs but all needing to be done before the start of the Xpart.

So those of you that have read all that will notice that the build diary has been a bit of an afterthought!

I'll get a load of photos up tomorrow from my work machine so the story has some substance.

Been a long few months!

I must say thanks though for the advice given on here for when I got stuck.

Last edited by Neb; 12-02-2013 at 01:15 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost
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Old 12-02-2013, 01:19 PM   #7
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Few more pictures - from today. I quite like the freebie DIY black decals - took fooking ages to get right.

Basically finished other than the dampers, timing belt & pump & rear slave cylinders & a good bleed.

Enjoy!









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Old 15-02-2013, 11:58 AM   #8
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So only a few hours to the first event in "Gail" and it's been a long week tweaking those last bits and pieces.

Had a coolant hose pop on Wednesday night too, after doing the cam belt and water pump. I think i hadn't bled the system properly and pressure had built up. It actually went on one of the connections to the heat exchanger for the oil circuit so have packed a spare top hose (without the connections) in the car. I managed to cut the hose back enough to get a decent connection and it has been OK since.

Can't do much more now so will have to give it the beans!

This link http://mtc1.co.uk/results/xpart13/Ov...esultsSlim.php is for the live timing of the rally.
We are car 21 but as you can see there are a few other Rallyes in the field, which I would like to beat. We are running in the 1300cc and below semi experts class 5 and would like to come away with a finish primarily but would also like to bring the class home if we can.
First events in any car are a testing exercises though so a finish is the best we can hope for.

Will report back Sunday, hopefully with a celebratory stinking hangover.....
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Old 15-02-2013, 12:45 PM   #9
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Good luck bud,,, but keep an eye on the front springs for going coil-bound . We had to get Eibach 60mm Hi Tens springs with Sq section tenders - they are wound from a thin wire giving more compression travel.
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Old 15-02-2013, 01:13 PM   #10
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Wow, loads of Rallye's in there! Best of luck.
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Old 15-02-2013, 07:58 PM   #11
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really good to see a build where it's not 'sent this to x to be built, ordered this from y and bolted it on and this was delivered from z'

good luck on the event
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Old 18-02-2013, 01:01 PM   #12
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Thanks chaps but afraid it didn't go to plan exactly....

We split the top hose again when going to pick the trailer up on Friday (hose was old and shite), I repaired it on the Friday night and re-bled the system but over heating followed for the whole weekend.

We started the rally, promptly missed the split & merge on the first test but picked up the pace after that, setting some decent times along with a joint quickest on one test. Most of the time our times were in the top ten or just outside.

Another maximum followed when the top hose split again but I had packed another top hose without the lower oil heat exchanger connections which i had to change mid test in a cloud of steam. It was around this point that with the red temperature light being on almost all the time we'd be foolish to continue and do any damage to the engine. We had some sort of coolant airlock or blockage somewhere in the system which no matter what we did we just couldn't clear. I need to investigate to see what the craic is.

We had our luck early on ending up about 25 yards off the test just getting through a hole in the tree line on a very muddy & potholed straight at about 80mph where the car just nicked a pothole with corner of one of the rear wheels putting us into a spin which could have ended in a silver birch being implanted in the front of the car.

There were positives - The car went well on some very rough Suffolk/Norfolk/Essex gravel/concrete/mud/grass tests. The suspension was better than expected but the front dampers are not really up to the job and some PSF gravel ones are on the list. 225lbs springs are about right for this sort of thing.
The engine pulled really well and was more than a match for the 1400cc cars when we caught them after splits & merges. We even over took a few on the tests!
Most positive was that we were not that far off the pace in our class on our first rally out. We were catching a few others in the top class too.

I'll add a bit better write up & some photos when i get them, might even be some video knocking about.

We'll be back.....
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Old 18-02-2013, 02:09 PM   #13
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Worth investing in some BakerBM silicon hoses? Sounds like you've got the fundamentals right though.
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Old 18-02-2013, 02:40 PM   #14
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I'll replace the top hose for a silicon one but the rest are ok.

She's a go'er, but need to sort this coolant issue before i do anymore events. We knocked the middle out of the thermostat (again replaced last week) so it's not that so i can only think something must be living in the bottom of the rad. I hope it's not the Head Gasket.....
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Old 20-02-2013, 01:06 PM   #15
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So looks like i have found the problem.... Rad was blocked... or at least dosen't flow as well as the spare i didn't have with me on the Xpart.

It held nearasdamit the same amount of water but when i ran the garden hose through it there was a definite difference in the flow from the top connection to the bottom to the spare.

Took it up the road last night and gave her the beating of her life and it never got above half on the gauge (thermostat has the middle taken out currently).

A new Nissens rad is on the list of replacement bits along with another 82deg thermostat.

That's motorsport.....
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Old 25-02-2013, 12:49 PM   #16
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A few photos from the Xpart, all taken by Andy Manston Of M&H.







The last one is about 10mins before we retired.....

Few bits turning up over the next few weeks:
2x 10" fans
Baker BM Silicon top hose
New Ally seat mounts (swopped from a mates XSI originals were steel Sparco jobbies and weighed a ton)
Baker BM Group N Top engine mount & small lower mount
Gravel Dampers - but undecided what to go for at the moment.

List of little jobs is getting long again following a Saturday of looking round the car, taking the sump guard off tonight too so will probably be a few more as well.
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Old 27-03-2013, 02:21 PM   #17
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So yesterday turned into being a decent day, A couple of magazines turned up with the Wallye rallye in it.

PPC Magazine have run the story of the build this month & next, they have done it really well and another thing off the bucket list. Have a look if you get chance, few tips how to build a rally car in there.... and not finish!

The Wallye has been given a bit of TLC following it's first rally:
Fitted the additional fan on the bumper side of the rad and replaced the orginal one with a slightly better XSI one i had spare.
Replaced the old crappy top hose & thermostat.
Replaced the Top engine mount & small lower one for the Baker BM solid ones (once i had worked out how it all went together!). Top one is a nice bit of kit actually and well designed.
Seats have been sorted (saved about 2kg)
Had to replace the master switch too as one of the kids was jumping around in the car and snapped the section that takes the key off. Little shite.
Repaired the fuel gauge sender, one of the soldered connections had gone dry and was causing all sorts of weird readings on the gauge... Now when i go round a corner it either is full or empty depending on the angle but at least i know if there is any it (when its on a straight...!)

Still to do:
Suspension.
I'm going to convert the fronts to the cup car type upside down shocks (as posted elsewhere on here).
I can do it!!!!
Bought some new disc's & pads - EBC now do yellow stuff for the bendix range so gone for them & Kam racings brembo discs.

Recently out on a very wet/snowy Woodbridge Targa road rally, came 20th o/a out of 70+ entries which i was a bit disappointed about but got a 2nd in class pot & set some reasonable times on some old & rock hard A539's.
That was with my buddy Lee Bez in his red S1 rallye. We had a fun day out (and a few beers the night before) but was really cold.
I'll try and get some photos up if i get chance.

Next event - not sure yet, i really fancied the Myotis road rally down on the Salisbury Plain but plans with the Blue S2 have put paid to that. So probably the local autotests and another Targa in May at Debden.
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Old 27-06-2013, 01:01 PM   #18
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Not a huge amount to report with Gail to be frank. In honesty the Blue S2 has been taking up a lot of spare time and the Brands instructing has been a bit busier as well.

The suspension conversion has ground to a halt currently, i'm going to have to replace the shock tubes with the correct diameter ones as the 0.5mm tolerance around the bush is just too much and the shocks are not tight enough. Bit of a ball ache but still going to persevere.

Did a couple of jobs last night, drive shaft oil seals & fixed the intermittent washer pump and started to get ready for the next event which is next weekend.

I have been invited up to the MSA's Go Motorsport open day up at Silverstone on the 7th July. The car will be static on the Endurance Road Rally stand and draped with the PPC magazine article. I was hoping they'ed let me have a crack at the autosolo hot rides but i can't move the car off the stand.

Should be an interesting day, hopefully lots of people keen to get into Motorsport in it's various guises and i'll be doing a couple of talks through the day on car preparation.

If i get the chance a bit later i'll post up a thing elsewhere on here, i'll also get some photo's up of the "damp" Targa.
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